Yearly Archives: 2013


White Sugar, Brown Sugar by E.G. Tripp [Review]

White Sugar, Brown Sugar by E.G. Tripp [Review]

White Sugar, Brown Sugar by E.G. Tripp My rating: 3 of 5 stars Summary:  White Sugar, Brown Sugar is a novel set in Daytona Beach, Florida. An upper middle-class white boy from the peninsula, or beach-side, of the Inland Waterway, and a black boy of lesser means, who lives west of the railroad tracks, where Blacks (who were called Negroes and other names at the time) were required to live, become good friends, in spite of the racial separation in effect in the 60’s in the south. David “Jude” Armstrong and Roosevelt Harris meet at a basin of a yacht club. Jude, the white boy, fishes from the docks, where […]



Review: The Things I Do For You by M. Malone

Review: The Things I Do For You by M. Malone

I think what bothers me the most is what bothers me about a lot of books, especially romances– they’re like fantasies and wet dreams. Rich beautiful people and their problems. Little to no conflict, I don’t care or feel any particular emotion for them. I’m following along like a soap opera and not involved like a well written drama.





Back at One

I’m horrible at following my own advice. I think we all are, but I really am, to the point where I don’t know why people ask my opinion on things. I can’t seem to follow the good advice I give to people, and when I do, it’s mostly for self preservation. Not because it happens to be really good advice.



Letting Go

I think, over time, I have made the (not so difficult) decision to let my unfinished novel go. I won’t delete it, but I’m not making it past what I’ve written so far.  The inability to finish this work is eating away at my confidence as a writer. It’s making me second guess my talent and wonder if I am, indeed a writer. Maybe I am a writer but not a novelist? A writer but not an author? At any rate, I am tired of thinking about how I have to dig that thing out and keep pounding away on it. I am ready to think about something new. Whatever […]





Review: The Laughterhouse by Paul Cleave

I find Cleave’s representation of Cole is so complex. He wants to made out as a monster, but he’s not a sick freak. He’s killed 4 people and kidnapped a doctor and his three daughters, but he’s angry that the press wonders if he’s molested the three little girls he’s kidnapped. I alternately empathize with and detest Caleb Cole. In my heart of hearts I feel his pain, but I also feel frusration that he doesn’t listen to reason. He’s made up his mind. The most dangerous folks are those that have nothing to lose.